Tax Filing Information for Coronavirus Distributions

In March 2020, Congress passed the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act. The legislation included a provision that allowed qualified retirement plan participants and IRA account holders to take penalty-free early distributions totaling no more than $100,000 between January 1 and December 31, 2020. If you took advantage of this measure, here’s what you need to know for tax filing.

What Is a Coronavirus Distribution?

In order for a distribution to be qualified under the CARES Act, it must have been made to a qualifying individual before December 31, 2020. You qualify if you, your spouse, or dependents were diagnosed with the virus, or if you, your spouse, or someone who shares your principal residence experienced a pandemic-related financial setback as a result of:

  • A quarantine, furlough, layoff, or reduced work hours
  • An inability to work due to lack of child care
  • Owning a business forced to close or reduce hours
  • Reduced pay or self-employment income
  • A rescinded job offer or delayed start date for a job

The Three-Year Rules

A key provision in the Act allows the distribution(s) to be spread “ratably” over three years for purposes of calculating tax payments. In other words, the total can be reported in equal amounts on your 2020, 2021, and 2022 tax returns. For example, if you received a $15,000 distribution, you could report $5,000 in income for each of the three years. However, if you prefer, you can generally report the entire distribution in your 2020 tax filing.

Another provision allows you to repay all or a part of your coronavirus distribution to an eligible retirement plan within three years from the day after the date the distribution was received. Repayments will be treated as if you enacted a trustee-to-trustee transfer, and no federal income taxes will be owed. (A repayment to an IRA is not considered a rollover for purposes of the one-rollover-per-year rule.)

If you pay your income taxes prior to repaying the distribution, your repayment will reduce the amount of the distribution income you report in a subsequent year. Or instead, you may file an amended return, depending on your specific situation. Consider speaking with a tax professional before making any final decisions.

How to Report Distribution Income

If you received a coronavirus distribution(s) in 2020, you should use Form 8915-E, Qualified Disaster Retirement Plan Distributions and Repayments, to report the income as part of your 2020 federal income tax filing. You can also use this form to report any recontributed amounts.

 

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE

The information in this report was prepared by Taiber Kosmala & Associates, LLC. Opinions represent TKS’ and IPIS’ opinion as of the date of this report and are for general information purposes only and are not intended to predict or guarantee the future performance of any individual security, market sector or the markets generally. IPI does not undertake to advise you of any change in its opinions or the information contained in this report. The information contained herein constitutes general information and is not directed to, designed for, or individually tailored to, any particular investor or potential investor.

This report is not intended to be a client-specific suitability analysis or recommendation, an offer to participate in any investment, or a recommendation to buy, hold or sell securities. Do not use this report as the sole basis for investment decisions. Do not select an asset class or investment product based on performance alone. Consider all relevant information, including your existing portfolio, investment objectives, risk tolerance, liquidity needs and investment time horizon.

This communication is provided for informational purposes only and is not an offer, recommendation or solicitation to buy or sell any security or other investment. This communication does not constitute, nor should it be regarded as, investment research or a research report, a securities or investment recommendation, nor does it provide information reasonably sufficient upon which to base an investment decision. Additional analysis of your or your client’s specific parameters would be required to make an investment decision. This communication is not based on the investment objectives, strategies, goals, financial circumstances, needs or risk tolerance of any client or portfolio and is not presented as suitable to any other particular client or portfolio.  Securities and investment advice offered through Investment Planners, Inc. (Member FINRA/SIPC) and IPI Wealth Management, Inc., 226 W. Eldorado Street, Decatur, IL 62522. 217-425-6340.

Charitable Giving

Charitable giving can play an important role in many estate plans. Philanthropy cannot only give you great personal satisfaction, it can also give you a current income tax deduction, let you avoid capital gains tax, and reduce the amount of taxes your estate may owe when you die.

There are many ways to give to charity. You can make gifts during your lifetime or at your death. You can make gifts outright or use a trust. You can name a charity as a beneficiary in your will, or designate a charity as a beneficiary of your retirement plan or life insurance policy. Or, if your gift is substantial, you can establish a private foundation, community foundation, or donor-advised fund. Continue reading “Charitable Giving”

How Women Are Different from Men, Financially Speaking

Women today have never been in a better position to achieve financial security for themselves and their families. What financial course will you chart?

We all know men and women are different in some fundamental ways. But is this true when it comes to financial planning? In a word, yes.

Everyone wants financial security. But women often face unique obstacles that can affect their ability to achieve it. Let’s look at some of these potential headwinds. Continue reading “How Women Are Different from Men, Financially Speaking”

Coping with Market Volatility: Cash Can Help Manage Your Mindset

Cash Can Help Manage Your Mindset

Holding an appropriate amount of cash in a portfolio can be the financial equivalent of taking deep breaths to relax. It could enhance your ability to make thoughtful investment decisions instead of impulsive ones. Having a cash position coupled with a disciplined investing strategy can change your perspective on market volatility. Knowing that you’re positioned to take advantage of a downturn by picking up bargains may increase your ability to be patient.  Continue reading “Coping with Market Volatility: Cash Can Help Manage Your Mindset”

Financial Peace of Mind in the Age of Coronavirus

Financial Peace of Mind in the Age of Coronavirus

https://www.finra.org/investors/insights/financial-peace-mind-age-coronavirus

The headlines are hard to ignore. Coronavirus (COVID-19)-related cases and deaths are increasing around the globe, supply chains have been interrupted, financial markets are experiencing historic volatility, and businesses are questioning how they will weather the storm.

When it feels like so many things are out of our control, sometimes the best thing to do is focus on the things that are. Here are five questions to ask for some financial peace of mind in the age of coronavirus.  Continue reading “Financial Peace of Mind in the Age of Coronavirus”

How Much House Can You Afford?

Introduction

An old rule of thumb said that you could afford to buy a house that cost between one and a half and two and a half times your annual salary. In reality, there’s a lot more to take into consideration. You’ll want to know not only how much of a mortgage you qualify for, but also how much you can afford to spend on a home. In order to know how much you can truly afford, you need to take an honest look at your lifestyle and your standard of living, as well as your income and what you choose to spend it on. Continue reading “How Much House Can You Afford?”

Homeownership

What is it?

If you’re like most consumers, homeownership involves the largest financial transaction you’ll participate in during your lifetime. As such, it’s no wonder that the process of buying or selling a home can be so stressful, frustrating, and, at times, totally confusing. If you want to ensure that you make sound financial decisions and survive the process with your sanity intact, you should first educate yourself about real estate transactions and then engage in careful planning. Your first step should be to ask yourself: “Do I really want to own a home? Continue reading “Homeownership”